John Byrne on Drucker: "The Man Who Invented Management"

| 1 Comment | No TrackBacks

A human look at Drucker's contributions from John Byrne and Lindsey Gerdes at BW:

-- It was Drucker who introduced the idea of decentralization -- in the 1940s -- which became a bedrock principle for virtually every large organization in the world.

-- He was the first to assert -- in the 1950s -- that workers should be treated as assets, not as liabilities to be eliminated.

-- He originated the view of the corporation as a human community -- again, in the 1950s -- built on trust and respect for the worker and not just a profit-making machine, a perspective that won Drucker an almost godlike reverence among the Japanese.

-- He first made clear -- still the '50s -- that there is "no business without a customer," a simple notion that ushered in a new marketing mind-set.

-- He argued in the 1960s -- long before others -- for the importance of substance over style, for institutionalized practices over charismatic, cult leaders.

-- And it was Drucker again who wrote about the contribution of knowledge workers -- in the 1970s -- long before anyone knew or understood how knowledge would trump raw material as the essential capital of the New Economy.read it here

Check out this very, very interesting podcast... John Byrne talks about his first meeting with Peter Drucker and his wife Doris at the YMCA in Estes Park, on how Drucker saw "business as an opportunity to build community" - executive pay - and much, much more.

Warren Bennis: "Peter Drucker, how do you learn?"
Answer: " By listening, only to myself!"

Great podcast!

No TrackBacks

TrackBack URL: http://www.christiansarkar.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-t.cgi/102

1 Comment

Drucker believed in being widely informed something the writers responsible for these quotes are certainly not:

"He was the first to assert that workers should be treated as assets, not as liabilities..."

"He originated the view of the corporation as a human community built on trust and respect for the worker and not just a profit-making machine..."

"He argued long before others for the importance of substance over style, for institutionalized practices over charismatic, cult leaders"

Drucker would never claim to have originated any of those things. His scholarship would have given credit where credit was due.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Christian Sarkar published on November 22, 2005 2:57 PM.

Koppel Steps Down: The End for Nightline? was the previous entry in this blog.

Cartoon: "Diet Secrets of the Picasso Bulls" is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.