Measuring Knowledge Management: OECD Report

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The results of an OECD survey on Knowledge Management practices in Canada, Germany, Denmark and more. Interesting, but not earth-shattering.

What they state as findings:

● KM practices have spread across the economy, just as technology diffuses;
● KM practices are implemented to deal with a great variety of objectives
(static efficiency, innovation, co-ordination);
● Size matters: firms manage their knowledge resources differently,
depending upon their size, and with little regard to industrial classification;
● KM practices matter for innovation and productivity performance;
● Cluster of practices: although this is a bit premature to make this kind of
statement, cluster of practices makes it possible to see the two main
strategies: codification and personalisation;
● Survey respondents showed a high level of interest, which in fact increases
as the size of the firm grows.

PDF download here.

I've always thought that different cultures view knowledge differently. Some cultures value knowledge more than others. In India, for example, I classify people into two groups- the devotees of Lakshmi and the devotees of Saraswati.

Lakshmi reminds me of Aphrodite. She's the goddess of beauty, fortune and prosperity. Gold coins fall from her hands. Two white elephants, symbols of luck, accompany her everywhere. During Diwali, the festival of lights, people light up their houses with candles (or electric lights) so Lakshmi will find her way to their house.

And Saraswati reminds me of Athena. She's the the goddess of wisdom, the arts, and eloquent speech. She's seen as the mother of the Veda, creator of the Sanskrit language and Devanagari letters. The protector of fine-arts and sciences. In her hands are a Vina (a musical instrument symbolising the arts) and a lotus (or a parchment - symbolising learning) and a rosary . Her Vahana (vehicle) is a swan (or sometimes a peacock).

My dad used to worship Saraswati once a year (on her "feast" day) in a very modest ceremony. His wealthy friends used to worship Lakshmi in much more elaborate (and expensive) rituals.

To me this works across cultures- either you worship money, or you worship the truth. The numbers of Saraswati followers are dwindling fast.

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This page contains a single entry by Christian Sarkar published on November 3, 2005 11:42 AM.

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